Afrigator

What’s more important what’s Right or getting caught

December 29, 2009
By Michael Fletcher

I’m becoming more and more annoyed with the state of humanity. It seems the notion of right has completely dissappeared from the world. Everywhere I go I see people trying to get away with a shortcut here, a corner cut there. By small degrees the world’s gone to hell. Next thing you know they’ll make a movie based on the A-team.

What’s right?

Nothing, well not at the moment. Having worked with the public for a while I can tell you parents are pretty much oblivious to the lessons they’re teaching their children. Every time a mother insists an under age child be allowed to watch an age restricted movie or that some policy doesn’t apply to them, they’re simply telling their kids the rules don’t apply to us. What do you expect in a society where kids call their parents by their first names and parents jockey for popularity.

So what’s that mean Mike?

It means the end of personal development as we know it. The contempt for the rules we’re breeding in our offspring is meaning kids are increasingly looking outside of themselves for the causes of their problems. We are as a planet becoming less self aware.

So what’s this ultimate right crap you’re talking bout?

Some would argue there is no ultimate right. What we should and shouldn’t do are relative. Fair comment. So relative to our current reality, what is the absolute right? Is that what we’re teaching our kids? Or are we teaching them it’s ok to wake up late and then break the speed limit on the drive in too work, as long as you don’t get caught?
Evidence of what we’re teaching our kids is all around us. Go walk round outside in an unpoliced area and tell me how safe you feel. We’ve socially devolved as a species by about 100 years and are heading back into the wild west where the only law is the law that can be enforced.

So next time you:

  • Jump a stop street
  • Jaywalk
  • Break the speed limit
  • Sneak food into the movies
  • “Borrow” some stationary from work
  • Cut-in in traffic
  • Talk about someone behind their back
  • Argue that the customer is always right when you know you’re wrong
  • Cut in line at a fast food outlet
  • Park illegally
  • Submit a creative version of your taxes
  • Overlook the cashier giving you too much change
  • Cheat at a board game
  • Put an empty milk carton back in the fridge

Think about the lesson you’re teaching and the statment you’re making. This rule doesn’t apply to me… Unless I get caught.
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7 Comments on “What’s more important what’s Right or getting caught”

  1. Jim Hardin says:

    Yes what happened to honesty and integrity. People just don’t care anymore. Well some people don’t. Some just do what ever they can cheat, lie, steal to get ahead. What about hard work. Sure it isn’t easy, but it does pay off. I think what happens is that people see other people taking short cuts to get ahead and they say why shouldn’t I everyone else does it. Well maybe it will turn around one day

    [Reply]

    Michael Fletcher Reply:

    Indeed, it’s frustrating how uncommon courtesy and integrity has become. I think if good people became more ruthlessly good we’d stand a chance :) Thanks for stopping by.

    [Reply]

  2. This is one of the best posts I have read recently and really struck a cord with me as a father.

    I sometimes think I’m being too strict with my child teaching the rights and wrongs, being polite, making him do sign launguage etc, but when I pick him up at school I realise I’m absolutely doing the right thing.

    Some of the kids at his school don’t even know what an orange is never mind how to sign it, but the important thing is that he is regarded as the best behaved well manored child there.

    Lead by example.

    Great post, retweeting it now!
    TheInfoPreneur´s last blog ..Good or Bad, Be Unique My ComLuv Profile

    [Reply]

    Michael Fletcher Reply:

    Yeah, we can’t fix the world but we need to start at home. The world is a big place but every life we touch we touches many others. The only way to start the change is simply to start. Be hard on your kid now and he’ll thank you in the long run. A well adjusted child who knows right from wrong is an unstoppable force in the current value bereft society we live in.

    [Reply]

  3. Gordie says:

    Hey Michael,
    Interesting post.

    I think it’s really hard to sometimes say what is right and wrong. I think we should be asking ourselves what is better or more efficient.

    A simple example. People lining up when waiting to buy tickets. It’s much more practical and fair if people take their turn rather that jostling and pushing and causing arguments and fights to break out. It shouldn’t need a rule or law to stipulate it, but like you said Western society seems to be devolving.

    The problem with governments creating more laws is that you can ending up creating more criminals. An example is the War on Drugs in America. It’s been a complete failure and cost hundreds of billions, if not already over a trillion dollars since it started and it hasn’t made any significant dent in drug use. While, personally being strongly against drug abuse, I can’t see the point is jailing all these people, especially those occasionally smokes marijuana. I think there has to be some leeway for people’s conscience to choose what they do.

    However, when it comes to harming others, then there needs to be standards, rules and even laws.

    I agree with your comment that it needs to start in the home. At the moment it’s parents who seem to be too hands-off or even apathetic to do any real parenting and educating.
    Gordie´s last blog ..Look, Mom! My Blog’s Sprouting Pubes! My ComLuv Profile

    [Reply]

    Michael Fletcher Reply:

    I’m gonna go out on a limb and disagree with you, and say that there are some incontrovertable “rights” and “wrongs” we know all know what we should and shouldn’t be doing that conscience bit of our brain reminds us of it. Sadly though the values we’ve been taught tend to override the value we put on those that conscience. I am all for a less regulated society but sadly through years of bad parenting and poor life skill education we are not going to be able to leave kids or even adults to their own devices for a very long time.

    [Reply]

  4. Don Power says:

    Hey Mike!

    I’ve read a lot of posts and tweets lately that quote Gandhi – “Be the change you want in the world”. And whomever wrote this line for Michael Jackson (maybe Michael wrote it himself?)got it right too “If you want to make the world a better place…start with the man in the mirror”.

    I am not a political activist and I have felt guilty in the past for not “doing” things to make a change. But then, one of my good friends (who doesn’t have kids) pointed out that I’m raising kids that realize what it means to be selfish compared to what it means (and how it feels) to be generous.

    I’m raising kids who remember to say please and thank you – (and I’m sure one day they’ll say it without any prompting ;)

    I’m raising kids who know that cutting corners, that cheating is not fair – and that justice is its own reward.

    Little things grow into big things.

    My man, Stevie Wonder sang it right too:

    “What did your Daddy tell you ’bout lies?
    He said it isn’t polite to tell a white one.

    What did your mama tell you bout lies?
    She said one white one turns into a black one…”

    Cheers man, let’s not tell lies, cut corners, or cheat. Let’s strive for the ultimate right!

    - Don
    Don Power´s last blog ..Where were you on Y2K? My ComLuv Profile

    [Reply]

    Michael Fletcher Reply:

    I think the very definition of a political activist is a parent. Well a good parent. In a very real way you’re going out to bat and making the bit of society you’re responsible for better. Oh how I miss the sound of children saying please and thank you and waiting until adults are done talking before they start. Guess I’m just old fashioned that way. Stevie’s got it right there if you teach children the right things when they’re young they’ll be equipped for life. If you don’t you’re in for some nasty surprises. You reap what you sow I guess.

    A great book that covers the state of children today and one of my personal favourites is The Sibling Society
    by Robert Bly a really sobering read.

    [Reply]

  5. Michelle Mangen thevirtualasst.com says:

    Michael:

    Ouch, I saw myself in some of the things you mentioned….and you are so correct. This post has certainly made me more aware and I will certainly do better with the lessons I am teaching my son that may contradict what I say outloud.
    Michelle Mangen´s last blog ..Section Widget: WordPress PlugIn Review My ComLuv Profile

    [Reply]

    Michael Fletcher Reply:

    LOL sorry if it was a little close to home, truth be told if you recognise the behaviour then this post is probably not about you. It’s aimed more at the many many many parents out there who don’t even realise they’re screwing their kids up. I hope not to get robbed by any of them one day :P

    [Reply]

  6. Sire says:

    I so understand how parents fit into this. You see it all the time and they always use the excuse that their kids have the right to express themselves.

    The school has a school uniform and the kids come to school dressed like a slob. Instead of telling the kid off they try to argue the kids rights.

    There’s a no earing policy for boys and the parents argue the school is trying to stop freedom of expression.

    It’s no wonder that they’re turning out the way they are.

    In regards to speed limits, I’ve been guilty of that :( I have to stop creeping over those damn limits, especially the unreasonable ones. ;)
    Sire´s last blog ..Update On Stolen Blog Content My ComLuv Profile

    [Reply]

    Michael Fletcher Reply:

    I see this more and more parents enter into these popularity contests trying to impress the kids or assert their authority or whatever the case may be, and to hell with everyone else.
    I don’t know if it’s just because my mother was a school teacher but, but in my day we didn’t dare complain about anything that happened at school and all in all I think that made us all a lot more responsible and independant.

    [Reply]

    Sire Reply:

    Your not wrong. I remember my first day in primary school when my dad introduced me to the teacher and told her she had his permission to hit me if I did anything wrong. Sure I played up on occasion but I never told my dad because I knew what would happen.

    Now the kid goes running home to their parents because the teacher yelled at them and all hell breaks loose. No wonder we have a lack of discipline.
    Sire´s last blog ..What Is This World Coming To When It Comes To Morals My ComLuv Profile

    [Reply]

  7. Self Esteem selfesteemsolutions.org says:

    Great post! Thank you so much for all you do, i’ll keep reading.

    [Reply]

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